Archive for the 'Laminated Flooring' Category

Steps on How to Install Laminated Flooring

Posted in Laminated Flooring on May 2nd, 2007

Laminated flooring is a great floor covering idea since it can provide the home with various look may it be rustic stone, soothing ceramic or classic wood laminated flooring is simply the best option. And the best thing about laminated flooring is that it is very affordable so you can have the quality, style and durability at prices that will not break the bank.

Since laminate is a floating floor, they sort of produce a slight tapping sound as you walk on it. If the tapping sound annoys you then you may place some acoustical padding to muffle the sound with varying results. To be sure on you may test the acoustical padding in your dealer display floor in order to provide you with the idea on just how it will sound in your home.

And remember to follow the manufacturer’s recommendations when installing or making other decisions related to the installation of laminated flooring. There is an increase in the cost of hardwood flooring so covering an entire room is a really expensive project. But thanks to engineered hardwood flooring and hardwood laminate flooring you will still be able to cover an entire room with hardwood flooring at a reasonable price.

Hardwood laminate flooring makes use of a manufacturing process that sandwich a composite fiberboard material in between two sheets of melamine. One melamine layer is the upper layer and may contain a thin sheet of real hardwood. This provides the completed board the appearance of a real hardwood plank or strip. Complete laminate flooring may make use of an embossing technique that can create a real texture that is close to real wood grain. In fact you will find it hard to distinguish between real hardwoods and laminate flooring when it is fully installed. How to install laminated flooring?

Trial layout

• For a cement floor, lay out the foam and seal the seams with duct tape. Likewise, for other types of floors you may lay the foam in the same direction as the planks, with no overlap. Then secure the planks with tape.

• Check the planks for damage. Don’t install damaged material, as it may void the manufacturer’s warranty.

• You should do a dry run of the first two rows. Lay the planks so that the tongue faces to the installer’s right. After you are through with the first row cut the plank to fit it. Then put spacers between the flooring and the wall. Be careful especially when dealing with walls that are not straight. Make use of spacers to keep the flooring straight.

• Use the leftover plank from the first row to start the next row. After you’re through, lay the remaining of the planks in the second row while ensuring that the rows are straight and that there are no gaps either on the side or butt joints. After the dry fit is accomplished, remove all the planks and start installing for real.

Actual installation process

1. First do a dry run, laying one row of boards with no glue to make sure everything lines up properly.

2. Start in a corner that’s not near the door, if possible. Lay down a row, groove side against the wall, without glue. Put distancing blocks between the boards and the wall.

3. If the wall is uneven you may have to cut the boards to fit it. Make sure to mark on the board exactly where it needs to be cut.

4. After you put the last board in place, use some kind of guide — a level or a 2×4 — to make sure the row is completely straight. Any unevenness can be adjusted with wedges.

5. Pick up all the boards except the corner one in the first row. Put glue on the short side of the board. Seal the end joints tight by pressing the boards together. Wipe off any excess glue promptly. The first two rows must be straight, or it will throw off the entire floor. The end joints must be very tight, too.